Nanomaterials: Discovery and Integration at CINT

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Venue:Academic Health Center 3-205

Abstract:

Interest in nanoscience—and derivative nanotechnologies—has grown explosively because of the perceived potential to beneficially impact almost every aspect of our lives. The fascination with nanostructured materials and interest in their unique, size-dependent properties will fade quickly if these novel materials cannot be exploited in new technologies. Hence, we are challenged not only to create, characterize and understand nanostructured materials in isolation, but also to learn how they will perform when integrated with other materials. As a DOE Office of Science National User Facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) provides expertise and capabilities to hundreds of researchers annually. In this presentation, I will use CINT research highlights including nanowires, nanomechanics, nanophotonics and composite materials to illustrate the CINT capabilities available to future CINT users for their own nanoscience research.

This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science user facility operated jointly by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Bio:

Neal D. Shinn, Ph.D. Co-Director DOE Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185-1315 ndshinn@sandia.gov

Dr. Shinn is the Co-Director for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), a nanoscience user facility jointly operated by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories for the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. He received the B.S. degree in Chemistry and Mathematics from the Pennsylvania State University in 1978 and the Ph.D. degree in Chemical Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1983. Thereafter, he was a National Research Council Post-Doctoral Fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, where his research involved the elucidation of surface reaction intermediates using vibrational and electronic spectroscopies in conjunction with thermal and stimulated desorption. In 1985, he joined Sandia National Laboratories as a Senior Member of the Technical Staff, later becoming the Manager of the Surface and Interface Science Department. Dr. Shinn’s research interests involve the physics and chemistry at solid surfaces. He has published over 85 scientific papers, serves on DOE and academic advisory boards, and was the 2007 President of the AVS Science & Technology society.