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2012 Events

  • AMO Search Committee Meeting - Dec. 4

    Dec. 4, 2012, 1pm-3pm, CP 220

    AMO Search Committee Meeting

  • Thesis Defense - Casey Neville

    Nov. 14, 2012, 9am-10:30am, CP 220

    Title: Improved Electronics for the Hall A Detectors at JLab: Summing Modules and VDC Amplifier/Discriminator Cards

  • Doctoral Dissertation Defense - Gopal Bhatta

    Nov. 7, 2012, 9am-10:30am, CP 220

    UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN ANNOUNCEMENT

    Florida International University University Graduate School

    Doctoral Dissertation Defense

    Abstract

    The Nature of Microvariability in Blazar 0716+714

    by

    Gopal P. Bhatta

    We organized an international campaign to observe the blazar 0716+714 in the optical. The observations took place from February 24, 2009 to February 26, 2009. The global campaign was carried out by observers from more that sixteen countries and resulted in an extended light curve nearly seventy-eight hours long. The analysis and the modeling of this light curve form the main work of this dissertation project. In the first part of this work, we present the time series and noise analyses of the data. The time series analysis utilizes discrete Fourier transform and wavelet analysis routines to search for periods in the light curve. We then present results of the noise analysis which is based on the idea that each microvariability curve is the realization of the same underlying stochastic noise processes in the blazar jet. Neither reoccurring periods nor random noise can successfully explain the observed optical fluctuations. Hence in the second part, we propose and develop a new model to account for the microvarability we see in blazar 0716+714. We propose that the microvariability is due to the emission from turbulent regions in the jet that are energized by the passage of relativistic shocks. Emission from each turbulent cell forms a pulse of emission, and when convolved with other pulses, yields the observed light curve. We use the model to obtain estimates of the physical parameters of the emission regions in the jet. The study showed that the distribution of the sizes of the turbulent region in the jet centers within 60 AU. This puts a constraint on magneto-hydrodynamical models of blazar jet. Besides, it supports our initial assumption that shock wave encountering a laminar flow of relativistic plasma may not produce microvariability.

    Date: November 07, 2012 Department: Physics Time: 09.00 a.m. Major Professor: James R Webb Place: Modesto Maidique Campus, CP 220

  • AMO Search Committee Meeting - Nov. 2

    Nov. 2, 2012, 1pm-2pm, CP 220

    AMO search committee will meet in CP220 from 1 pm to 2pm, Nov 2 (Friday). The committee will evaluate the applicants and compile a list of the candidates for phone interviews.

  • Doctor Dissertation Defense - Vanessa Gaultney Werner

    Sept. 14, 2012, 10am-12pm, CP 220

    Abstract: The study of the angular distribution of photon plus jet events in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is presented. The photon is restricted to the central region of the detector (|| < 1.4442) while the jet is allowed to be present in both central and forward regions of CMS (|| < 2.4). Dominant backgrounds due to jets fragmenting into neutral mesons are accounted for through the use of a template method that discriminates between signal and background. The angular distribution, |*|, is defined as the absolute value of the difference in between the leading photon and leading jet in an event divided by two. The angular distribution ranging from 0-1.4 is examined and compared with next-to-leading order QCD predictions and is found to be in good agreement.

  • Sigma Pi Sigma Ceremony and Reception

    April 28, 2012, 5pm, GC 140 and CP 220

    The Department is reviving its Sigma Pi Sigma Chapter after a few years in hiatus. Please join students and faculty for this important event and reception thereafter.

  • Colloquium - Nuclear Synergy: The Interplay Between Nuclear Physics and Medicine

    April 20, 2012, 1:30pm-3:30pm, AHC3 110

    Robert W. Laird, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physics St. Mary's University, TX Nuclear Synergy: The Interplay Between Nuclear Physics and Medicine

    Many of the tools and techniques currently utilized in medical physics can trace their origins to experimental nuclear physics. Specifically, positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and radiation therapy and imaging are excellent examples of how techniques of experimental nuclear physics are applied to medicine. A common theme in both nuclear physics and medical physics is the use of photons to investigate, understand, and solve problems of human interest. In nuclear physics, photons (i.e., gamma rays) are used to probe the internal structure of the atomic nucleus. In medical physics, photons (i.e., gamma rays, X rays, radio waves) are used to diagnose and treat disorders of the human body. In this presentation, I will share my past experiences in experimental nuclear physics research and illustrate how I have applied these techniques to address issues in medicine.

    Robert Laird poses with machinery.

  • 2012 Graduate Student Research Competition

    April 19, 2012, 9:30am-11:30am, CP 220

    The 2012 graduate student research competition will be held at 9:30-3:00 on Thursday, April 19 in CP 220. Attached PDF file is a detailed competition schedule. There are 11 students for the competition. Six of them will present their research at 9:30-12am, and the rest five students will present at 12:30-14:35. Award ceremony will be at about 5:00pm. In the ceremony, pizza and soda will be served.

  • Colloquium: On the Rigidity Problems Associated with the Bottom of Spectrum of Laplace-Beltrami Operators and the Degenerate Monge-Ampere Equation

    April 6, 2012, 1:30pm-3:30pm, AHC3 110

    Dr. Song-Ying Li
    University of California at Irvine
    California
    The Department of Physics holds a joint Colloquia Series with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The colloquia cover a broad range of topics and are targeted at a general audience. All are welcome to attend.

  • Colloquium: Classical Dynamical Systems out of Equilibrium

    March 30, 2012, 1:30pm-4:30pm, AHC3 110

    The Department of Physics holds a joint Colloquia Series with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The colloquia cover a broad range of topics and are targeted at a general audience. All are welcome to attend.

    Claude-Alain Pillet
    Universite de Tulon
    France

    Abstract

    • I will give a pedestrian introduction to general properties of entropy production in classical dynamical systems. In particular, I will explain what are the Evans-Searles and Gallavotti-Cohen symmetries, discuss their implications as well as their relations to spectral properties of some transfer operators (Liouvillians).
    • This material is based on a joint work with V. Jaksic (McGill) and L. Rey-Bellet (Amherst).
  • Colloquium: Electron Transport at the Nanoscale

    March 23, 2012, 1:30pm-3:30pm, AHC3 110

    Colloquium: Electron Transport at the Nanoscale Dr. An-Ping Li Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tennessee The Department of Physics holds a joint Colloquia Series with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The colloquia cover a broad range of topics and are targeted at a general audience. All are welcome to attend.

  • Talk: Simple Harmonic Motion & Kepler's Laws

    March 22, 2012, 3:30pm-5:30pm, CP 101

    Dr. David Garofalo California State University, Northridge

  • Doctoral Dissertation Defense: Marianna Y. Gabrielyan

    March 21, 2012, 9:30am-12:30pm, CP 220

    University Graduate School Bulletin Announcement

    Florida International University
    University Graduate School

    Doctoral Dissertation Defense

    Abstract

    Measurement of the Induced Polarization of Λ(1116) in Kaon Electroproduction with CLAS by Marianna Y. Gabrielyan

    The CLAS Collaboration is using the p(e,e′K+p)π- reaction to perform a measurement of the induced polarization of the electroproduced Λ(1116). The parity violating weak decay of the Λ into pπ−(64%) allows extraction of the recoil polarization of the Λ. This study uses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to detect the scattered electron, the kaon, and the decay proton. CLAS allows for a large kinematic acceptance in Q2 (0.8 ≤ Q2 ≤ 3.5 GeV2), W (1.6 ≤ W ≤ 3.0 GeV), as well as the kaon scattering angle. In this experiment a 5.499 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. The goal is to map out the kinematic dependencies for this polarization observable to provide new constraints for theoretical models of the electromagnetic production of K-hyperon final states. Along with previously published photo- and electroproduction cross sections and polarization observables from CLAS, SAPHIR, and GRAAL, these data are needed in a coupled-channel analysis to identify previously unobserved s-channel resonances.

  • Talk: The Sun & Circular Motion

    March 20, 2012, 1pm-3pm, CP 101

    Dr. Fiorella Terenzi Brevard Community College Department of Physics & Astronomy

  • Talk: Circular Motion

    March 19, 2012, 1pm-4pm, CP 103

    Dr. Andrew Meyertholen University of Redlands Department of Physics

  • Colloquium: Introduction to AdS/CFT with application to Heavy Ion Collision

    March 9, 2012, 1:30pm-4:30pm, AHC3 110

    Dr. Yuri Kovchegov Ohio State University

  • Colloquium: "Optical frequency combs and applications: coherent control of microwave, terahertz, optical regimes and beyond"

    March 8, 2012, 3pm, CP 220

    Dr. Qudsia Quraishi Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD

    Abstract: The powerful ideas behind optical frequency combs (OFC) are materializing in experiments that have revolutionized optical frequency metrology, optical atomic clocks and coherent control. OFCs are emitted by pulsed lasers whose pulse durations are on the order of femtoseconds. Within one of these lasers, millions of discrete optical frequencies are made coherent with one another through nonlinear processes in the cavity's gain medium. When the optical frequency comb modes are held fixed, the OFC may be used as an optical frequency 'ruler'. In this talk, I will start by presenting some of the fundamental ideas behind stabilized optical frequency combs both in the time and frequency domain. I will then present several applications that demonstrate the remarkable versatility of the OFC, specifically, low noise RF generation in the microwave domain, precision spectroscopy in the terahertz domain and finally, coherent quantum control in the optical domain.

  • AMO Faculty Search Committee Meets - March 8

    March 8, 2012, 10:45am-12:45pm, CP 220

    The faculty search committee will meet today at 4:15pm to discuss the candidates who have interviewed. All are invited.

  • Colloquium: Identifying spatial topography and intrinsic connectivity of functional brain networks via neuroimaging and neuroinformatics techniques

    March 7, 2012, 2:30pm-4:30pm, AHC3 110

    Angela R. Laird, Ph.D. University of Texas Health Science Center Department of Radiology San Antonio, TX

  • Colloquium - Simulating Atomic Nuclei

    March 2, 2012, 1:30pm-4:30pm, AHC3 110

    James Vary Department of Physics Iowa State University Ames, IA

    The Department of Physics holds a joint Colloquia Series with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The colloquia cover a broad range of topics and are targeted at a general audience. All are welcome to attend.

  • Physics Instructor Search Committee meets - Feb. 29

    Feb. 29, 2012, 1:30pm, CP 220

    The Physics Instructor Search Committee meets today at 1:30 pm, 2/29/2012 to discuss the applicant pool. Please direct questions or comments to Professor Bone, who chairs the committee.

  • Colloquium - "Exploring the Thermodynamics and Hydrodynamics of a Universal Fermi Gas"

    Feb. 28, 2012, 12:45pm-2:45pm, CP 220

    Dr. Haibin Wu Duke University Durham, NC

    Abstract: One of the greatest challenges in modern physics is to understand the behavior of an ensemble of strongly interacting particles. Many strongly interacting many-body systems (such as high temperature superconductor, neutron star and Fermi gases) share the same universal thermodynamic and hydrodynamic properties at unitary. Therefore, an ultracold Fermi gas can be used as a “quantum simulator” to study many fundamental physics from astrophysical to nuclear physics. Thermodynamics quantities (energy and entropy) and transport property (shear viscosity) have been measured with such strongly interacting Fermi gases in our lab. Shear viscosity is extracted from studying the decay rate of collective mode at low temperature and direct expansion of gas at high temperature. It shows universal temperature scale. The results are compared to conjecture of string theory, suggesting that the trapped Fermi gases are the best fluid ever observed. Optical control Feshbach resonance with molecular dark state is also discussed in this talk. The loss can be greatly depressed due to quantum interference. It will open many new study directions in strongly interacting quantum gases. I will conclude by discussing ways to combine these techniques to address outstanding questions in many-body dynamics, relativistic physics and beyond.

  • Colloquium - Salt Fingering at High and Low Prandtl Numbers

    Feb. 24, 2012, 1:30pm-3:30pm, AHC3 110

    Dr. Adrienne Traxler Florida International University Miami, Florida

    The Department of Physics holds a joint Colloquia Series with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The colloquia cover a broad range of topics and are targeted at a general audience. All are welcome to attend.

  • Colloquium - Exotic Hadrons at CERN COMPAS

    Feb. 21, 2012, 3pm-5pm, CP 220

    Dr. Murray Moinester Tel Aviv University Israel

  • Colloquium - Quantum States of Light: from Generation to Applications in Quantum Information

    Feb. 21, 2012, 12:30pm-2:30pm, CP 220

    Dr. Alberto M. Marino Joint Quantum Institute National Institute of Standards & Technology & the University of Maryland

    Abstract: The field of quantum information holds the promise of harnessing quantum resources to provide secure communications, perform complex calculations, and enhance the sensitivity of measurements. Among those resources, one of the most important is entanglement, which is characterized by correlations stronger than are allowed classically. Due to its fundamental role in quantum information science, the generation and control of entangled states of light are active areas of research. In this talk I will show that non-degenerate four-wave mixing (4WM) in rubidium vapor has applications in both of these areas. In the first part of the talk I will give a brief introduction into the topic of the generation and characterization of entangled states of light known as twin beams. I will show how it is possible to use 4WM to generate twin beams and will describe the advantages that are obtained with the use of this nonlinear process. In the second part of the talk I will present two applications of 4WM in quantum information: obtaining the best possible copy of a quantum state, i.e., a quantum cloner, and controlling the propagation velocity of the light carrying the entanglement, i.e., a quantum buffer. I will finish by giving an overview of possible future research directions

  • Stocker AstroScience Center Groundbreaking

    Feb. 21, 2012, 11am-1pm, Venue TBD

    FIU breaks ground on the Stocker AstroScience Center today. For more information please visit us at astroscience.fiu.edu 

  • Colloquium - How does the solar wind drive magnetospheric convection?

    Feb. 16, 2012, 2pm-4pm, CP 220

    Dr. Ramon Lopez University of Texas at Arlington Texas

    As the solar wind flows past the Earth's magnetic field, momentum and energy are transferred to the geospace system, causing the motion of plasma in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, along with the generation of electric fields and currents. In this talk I will explore the two major mechanisms for the transfer of energy - magnetic merging and the viscous interaction. I will show how these interactions lead to a voltage drop across the ionosphere from dawn to dusk, explain why this voltage drop is less than the voltage drop across the magnetosphere in the solar wind, and also explain how this leads to the phenomenon of saturation of the cross polar cap potential.

    Professor Ramon Lopez is a truly outstanding scientist and educator. Professor Lopez is an internationally-renowned scholar; both in Space Physics as well as in the area of Science Education. Dr. Lopez is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and was awarded the 2002 Nicholson Medal for Humanitarian Service. He also received the 2011 Bouchet Award. He is the author of more than 97 publications in refereed journals, 131 invited research presentations, and a popular book on Space Physics entitled: Storms from the Sun, (Joseph Henry Press, 2002).

    (This seminar will be given at the undergraduate level. As long as someone has had Physics 2, they can understand it, but it is really a physics seminar.)

    The Department of Physics holds a joint Colloquia Series with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The colloquia cover a broad range of topics and are targeted at a general audience. All are welcome to attend.

    This Colloquium is held in CP 220 and will begin promptly at 2:00 PM.

  • Physics Instructor Search Committee meets - Feb. 13

    Feb. 13, 2012, 1:30pm-3:30pm, CP 220

    The Physics Instructor Search Committee meets today at 1:30 pm, 2/13/2012 to discuss the applicant pool. Please direct questions or comments to Professor Bone, who chairs the committee.

  • Colloquium - Physical Analysis of the Hebrew Ostraca

    Feb. 10, 2012, 3pm-5pm, AHC3 110

    Physical Analysis of the Hebrew Ostraca Inscriptions of the First Temple Period Dr. Eli Piasetzky Tel Aviv University Israel The Department of Physics holds a joint Colloquia Series with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The colloquia cover a broad range of topics and are targeted at a general audience. All are welcome to attend.

  • Colloquium - Interaction of Laser Pulses with Plasmas

    Feb. 3, 2012, 1:30pm-4:30pm, AHC3 110

    Interaction of Laser Pulses with Plasmas Dr. Andrew Pearson Department of Earth Environment Florida International University The Department of Physics holds a joint Colloquia Series with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The colloquia cover a broad range of topics and are targeted at a general audience. All are welcome to attend.

  • Star Party

    Jan. 27, 2012, 8pm-10pm, CP 145

    As we wrap up the final planning stages and begin the actual construction of the Stocker AstroScience Center (StASC), I would like to invite you to our Celebratory star party to be held on Friday, January 27, 2012, in CP 145 starting at 8:00 pm.

    During the evening event I will present and in-depth introduction to the observatory, a virtual tour if you will, in preparation for a February groundbreaking. It is a very exciting time we would be honored if you could attend and celebrate this victory 15 years in the making. It will be co-sponsored by the FIU astronomy club and the Society of Physics Students. As usual at our public events, it is free, open to the public, we'll have refreshments, live music, and telescopes available to observe astronomical objects from our current observing pad. We sincerely hope you can join us for this truly epic celebration which you have helped make possible.

    • James R. Webb, Professor
    • (305) 348-3964
  • AMO Faculty Search Committee Meets - Jan. 27

    Jan. 27, 2012, 1pm-4pm, CP 220

    The Atomic Molecular Optics faculty search committee will me to discuss the tenure track position offered by FIU.